The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe (The Chronicles of Narnia (Publication Order) #1) by C.S. Lewis

Lion witch and wardrobeBlurb: Four adventurers step through a wardrobe door and into the land of Narnia, a land enslaved by the power of the White Witch. But when almost all hope is lost, the return of the Great Lion, Aslan, signals a great change . . . and a great sacrifice.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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This book satisfies challenge #9: A classic about a animal or which includes the name of an animal in the title. 

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5 stars

I’ve read this book about three times now. Still love it. I forgot how fast paced it was.  And the sentences are quite long-winded.  It was hard to read it to my daughter in any kind of rhythm cause I had to keep catching my breath, so annoying.

My kid loved it, we tore that book in about a month.  I read aloud to her so it takes a lot longer to finish books with her. My favorite part was when the wolf was fighting Peter and Aslan was all, “Nah bro, he needs to earn his bones on this fight, don’t help him.” I mean, not in those words but you get the idea. My daughters favorite part was the end, when they were all grown up and they came back through the wardrobe and no time had passed for them on earth.

Anyway, if you don’t know this book, you were probably never in the US public school system cause it mandatory reading here.  Great book, highly recommend.

Curly Carla_small

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (Oz #1) by L. Frank Baum

Wizard of ozBlurb: Dorothy thinks she’s lost forever when a tornado whirls her and her dog, Toto, into a magical world. To get home, she must find the wonderful wizard in the Emerald City of Oz. On the way she meets the Scarecrow, the Tin Woodman and the Cowardly Lion. But the Wicked Witch of the West has her own plans for the new arrival – will Dorothy ever see Kansas again?

 

 

 

 

 

 

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This book satisfies Book to the Classics Challenge #10: A classic set in a place you’d like to visit. 

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4 stars

My daughter and I read this together and really liked it. I found the sentences to be a bit run on so when I was reading it out loud to my daughter I kept having to pause in the middle to catch my breath! That was a bit annoying.

But the story itself was pretty funny and a bit morbid IMO.  If you have watched the movie but not read the book, lemme tell you; they are similar but by no means are they the same.  The tin man’s reason for being tin was…..bordering on the ridiculous.  My daughter and I kept laughing at each time he lost a limb.

And the Lion didn’t really come off as cowardly so much as bratty.  But I’m sure that’s just our modern interpretation.  I did love the flying monkeys.  They played a much bigger part in the book.  Each chapter was like a mini adventure, always something new that happened and was resolved by the end of it.  It kept us engaged in that aspect.
One thing I will spoil for you….her shoes are NOT red.

And did you know, there’s like 13 books in this series?  I had no idea.  Anyway, it was a fun read.  I definitely recommend it, especially if you had kids.

Curly Carla_small

Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury

fahrenhight 451Blurb: The system was simple. Everyone understood it. Books were for burning, along with the houses in which they were hidden. Guy Montag was a fireman whose job it was to start fires. And he enjoyed his job. He had been a fireman for ten years, and he had never questioned the pleasure of the midnight runs or the joy of watching pages consumed by flames, never questioned anything until he met a seventeen-year-old girl who told him of a past when people were not afraid. Then Guy met a professor who told him of a future in which people could think. And Guy Montag suddenly realized what he had to do.

 

 

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This book satisfies the Back to the Classics Challenge #8: A classic with a number in the title.

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4 stars

I listened to this audio book and it was fantastic. The words and phrases that were used in this book, well, people don’t use them anymore. Which made them all the more cool when I heard them. Now I listened to two different narrators. Tim Robbins, he was okay. But the other guy, Stephen Hoye, he rocked it so hard. His voice was deep but was able to hit the high female pitches as well. Really wished I listened to the whole book in his voice.

When I read certain books, sometimes I like to go in blind. Especially with classics because I don’t want to be influenced by anything if can help it. That means I didn’t read the blurb so I honestly had no idea what this book was about. I like being surprised with classics because well everyone already knows about them so its my small way of being different.

Anyway, firemen who intentionally burn instead of putting out fires. Books are illegal! Why, this world is topsy-turvy already! It’s a simple yet powerful concept that shows you how important literature really is. His world building was so effortless. The hound was a personal favorite, how fast the cars were, the ‘TV’ on the walls. It was all explained both easily and in depth. I know I’m not making sense but it’s true! It really felt like it could have been written now even with the older phasing. It’s still relevant.

I remember being so moved by some of the monologues and wondering what on earth RB was thinking as he wrote it. It felt very personal, almost.. vulnerable even. The ending kinda drifts away with no real close. But if you’ve read classics before you know that is how some of them end.

I have not read other books by RB but I’m sure I’ll check some more out in the future. Should be mandatory reading IMO.

Curly Carla_small